Shockwave therapy for Podiatrists

Shock wave therapy is a treatment product that was initially introduced into clinical practice in 1980 as a remedy for breaking down renal system stones. Ever since then it has today typically been used as a technique for soft tissue conditions and to induce the development of bone. Shock waves are generally higher strength sound waves produced under water using a high current blast. In musculoskeletal disorders you can use them to produce fresh blood vessel development and also to promote the making of growth factors just like eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) together with PCNA (proliferating cell antinuclear antigen). Consequently this leads to the improvement of the supply of blood and also to an increase in cell growth which will help healing. A newly released edition of the podiatry live, PodChatLive was spent talking about shock wave treatment for podiatrists.

In that particular episode of PodChatLive they chatted with Consultant Physio, academic and investigator Dylan Morrissey about how good the evidence foundation for shockwave therapy is and just how robust the methods which is generally applied within this kind of study. He in addition discussed just what foot as well as ankle disorders shockwave is usually used for and frequently used for and whether there are any crucial contraindications or pitfalls connected with shock wave's use. Dr Dylan Morrissey is a physio with over 25 years’ experience of employed in sports and exercise medicine. He accomplished his MSc at University College London in the UK in 1998 and then a PhD in 2005 at King’s College London, United Kingdom. Dylan is these days an NIHR/HEE consultant physical therapist and clinical reader in sports medicine and musculoskeletal physiotherapy at Bart’s and the London National Health Service trust / BL School of Medicine and Dentistry, QMUL. Dylan has obtained more than £5m in research funding and has published in excess of sixty peer-reviewed full papers. Dylan's primary research pursuits are shockwave and tendon issues, science interpretation as well as the link between movements and pathology.

How important are the small muscles in the foot?

There are many small muscles under the bottom of the foot and probably because of their size they have not been given much importance. This has started to change recently has research has begun to show just how important those muscles are to normal function and biomechanics of the foot. They appear to play an important roll in how we balance and problems with these small muscles is probably a factor in most of the toe deformities. This topic was addressed in a recent episode of the podiatry chat show that goes out live on Facebook called PodChatLive. In that episode the hosts talked with Luke Kelly who has published extensively in the field of plantar intrinsic foot muscle function and just how important they are. He talked about the spring-like function of the human foot when walking and the role of those muscles in that. He also talked about why it is false to assume a flatter foot is a “weaker” foot. He also explains why he is personally not a fan of the ‘short foot exercise’ and just why strengthening the intrinsic muscles will never make the medial longitudinal arch ‘higher’ which is widely believed myth.

Dr Luke Kelly PhD has over fifteen years of clinical experience helping people with pain due to musculoskeletal injury and chronic health conditions. He has completed a PhD in biomechanics and is actively involved in research that attempts to improve our understanding and management of common foot conditions, such as plantar heel pain, foot tendon injuries, osteoarthritis in the foot and children’s sporting injuries. He currently is a Senior Research Fellow within the Centre for Sensorimotor Performance in the School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences at the University of Queensland in Australia. Luke’s current research is examining how the brain and spinal cord integrates sensory feedback to adapt the mechanical function of the foot during walking.